FINAL Forecast of the Year for the Week of 2018 September 29

tiger swallowtail female intergrade Sept 14 2018 small

A mixed-up morph of Eastern Tiger Swallowtail, a perfect symbol of our crazy, mixed up, rollercoaster of a 2018 butterfly field year [2018 Sept. 14, Prince Georges Co MD. Photo by Walt Gould]

Welcome to the final edition for 2018 of the Mid-Atlantic Butterfly Field Forecast.  It’s been a terrific season with lots of surprises, many disappointments, and some real head-scratchers.  I hope you’ve been able to get out into the field to see some of the leps we’ve highlighted here.

This week, Long-tailed Skippers continued to show up sporadically across the region, fed I suspect by the substantial irruption of this species in South Carolina and points south.  Some observers there have been seeing 20 or more at a time.  Clouded Skipper and Ocola are out in considerable numbers, and these could grow considerably in the next couple of weeks the way they have in VA and the Carolinas.  We should also be looking for first and second instars of Brazilian Skipper where adults and mature caterpillars/pupae have been found.  They could pump out a final brood before frost.  Common Checkered-skippers are likely now in the appropriate habitat where their mallow caterpillar hosts are found.

Little Yellow is showing up after a summer’s absence in states to our south, so it should be looked for here in stands of partridge pea, especially on the Eastern Shore.  Cloudless Sulphur numbers seem to be spiking upwards.  Surely someone’s going to shout out about a Checkered White before frost!

Good numbers of White M’s are still being reported, as are small population spikes of Eastern Tailed-blue and continuing Great Purple Hairstreak.  Both Great Purple and coppers (Bronze and American) hang on well into October. There are also fresh Red-banded Hairstreaks on the wing and some Gray Hairstreaks as well.

There’s a small spike too of late Pearl Crescents, too (far as I can determine this brood has no confounding cocyta-group Northerns).  Some fresh Red-spotted Purples (including one closely approaching White Admiral from the Baltimore area) are flying now; they and our anglewings and cloaks will all be coming to trays of rotting fruit if you leave them out in the coming sunny autumn days.  They will likely be joined by American Snout, which is reported widely and sometimes as multiple individuals.  We have reliable numbers of Variegated Fritillaries, but it’s Common Buckeyes that look to boom in the next week or so — some local reports note high numbers already on the wing.  A fresh Great Spangled Fritillary was reported from the MD Piedmont!

Keep your eye out for Queens among the bumper crop of Monarchs; multiple sightings in the midwest and an earlier sighting in NJ suggest they may be experiencing a slight northward push this season.  That would be an excellent way to wrap up the 2018 season!

The weekend, for a change, looks glorious.  Perfect butterfly weather.  Don’t waste it.

FOR THE REST OF THE SEASON:  While I won’t be sending out Forecasts, I will share or post any interesting local sightings on Google Groups at MDLepsOdes, so send them along to me!  And of course, if they’re really exciting I’ll write something up for LepLog too.  Look for new Forecasts next April. 

This entry was posted in Forecasts, sightings. Bookmark the permalink.

3 Responses to FINAL Forecast of the Year for the Week of 2018 September 29

  1. fakeflamenco says:

    Hi, great photos and butterfly info. You might like my butterfly post, “Our Monarch Butterfly Rest Stop” on http://www.fakeflamenco.com/blog It’s a great year for monarchs in Wisconsin! -Rebecca

  2. Torre says:

    saw a very fresh Common Buckeye in the yard- Kensington, MD. it was enjoying some golden rod. Torre

  3. KATHY LITZINGER says:

    Late season zebra swallowtail hanging around for 2 days in Ellicott City, Maryland.

    WordPress.com | Rick posted: “Welcome to the final edition for 2018 of the Mid-Atlantic Butterfly Field Forecast.  It’s been a terrific season with lots of surprises, many disappointments, and some real head-scratchers.  I hope you’ve been able to get out into the field to see some of” | | Respond to this post by replying above this line |

    | | |

    | New post on Lep Log | |

    | | | | FINAL Forecast of the Year for the Week of 2018 September 29 by Rick |

    A mixed-up morph of Eastern Tiger Swallowtail, a perfect symbol of our crazy, mixed up, rollercoaster of a 2018 butterfly field year [2018 Sept. 14, Prince Georges Co MD. Photo by Walt Gould] Welcome to the final edition for 2018 of the Mid-Atlantic Butterfly Field Forecast.  It’s been a terrific season with lots of surprises, many disappointments, and some real head-scratchers.  I hope you’ve been able to get out into the field to see some of the leps we’ve highlighted here.This week, Long-tailed Skippers continued to show up sporadically across the region, fed I suspect by the substantial irruption of this species in South Carolina and points south.  Some observers there have been seeing 20 or more at a time.  Clouded Skipper and Ocola are out in considerable numbers, and these could grow considerably in the next couple of weeks the way they have in VA and the Carolinas.  We should also be looking for first and second instars of Brazilian Skipper where adults and mature caterpillars/pupae have been found.  They could pump out a final brood before frost.  Common Checkered-skippers are likely now in the appropriate habitat where their mallow caterpillar hosts are found.Little Yellow is showing up after a summer’s absence in states to our south, so it should be looked for here in stands of partridge pea, especially on the Eastern Shore.  Cloudless Sulphur numbers seem to be spiking upwards.  Surely someone’s going to shout out about a Checkered White before frost!Good numbers of White M’s are still being reported, as are small population spikes of Eastern Tailed-blue and continuing Great Purple Hairstreak.  Both Great Purple and coppers (Bronze and American) hang on well into October. There are also fresh Red-banded Hairstreaks on the wing and some Gray Hairstreaks as well.There’s a small spike too of late Pearl Crescents, too (far as I can determine this brood has no confounding cocyta-group Northerns).  Some fresh Red-spotted Purples (including one closely approaching White Admiral from the Baltimore area) are flying now; they and our anglewings and cloaks will all be coming to trays of rotting fruit if you leave them out in the coming sunny autumn days.  They will likely be joined by American Snout, which is reported widely and sometimes as multiple individuals.  We have reliable numbers of Variegated Fritillaries, but it’s Common Buckeyes that look to boom in the next week or so — some local reports note high numbers already on the wing.  A fresh Great Spangled Fritillary was reported from the MD Piedmont!Keep your eye out for Queens among the bumper crop of Monarchs; multiple sightings in the midwest and an earlier sighting in NJ suggest they may be experiencing a slight northward push this season.  That would be an excellent way to wrap up the 2018 season!The weekend, for a change, looks glorious.  Perfect butterfly weather.  Don’t waste it.FOR THE REST OF THE SEASON:  While I won’t be sending out Forecasts, I will share or post any interesting local sightings on Google Groups at MDLepsOdes, so send them along to me!  And of course, if they’re really exciting I’ll write something up for LepLog too.  Look for new Forecasts next April.  Rick | September 28, 2018 at 05:30 | Categories: Forecasts, sightings | URL: https://wp.me/pC1oh-2f6 | Comment |    See all comments |

    |

    |

    | Unsubscribe to no longer receive posts from Lep Log. Change your email settings at Manage Subscriptions. Trouble clicking? Copy and paste this URL into your browser: https://leplog.wordpress.com/2018/09/28/final-forecast-of-the-year-for-the-week-of-2018-september-29/ |

    |

    | |

    |

    | Thanks for flying with WordPress.com |

    |

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.