WABC Field Trip Sightings from May 12

Beth Johnson, Tom Stock and I traveled Saturday to Frederick and Montgomery Counties Maryland in search of butterflies. We ended up with 29 species for the day. The first area we covered was along Gambrill Park Road at the High Knob overlook and the Frederick Watershed WMA, where we found 21 species. Highlights here were four monstrously large mourning cloaks, clearly freshly eclosed; great numbers of dreamy duskywings still at mid-peak; and FOS (for me anyway) Hobomok skippers.  We thought we might see the resident Indian skippers at this location but it apparently was too early, even in this precocious season.

Pipevine Swallowtail (2)
Zebra Swallowtail (1)
Eastern Tiger Swallowtail (7)
Spicebush Swallowtail (4)
Cabbage White (2)
Orange Sulphur (6)
Red-banded Hairstreak (5)
Eastern Tailed Blue (2)
Summer Azure (1)
Pearl Crescent (1)
Question Mark (2)
Mourning Cloak (4)
American Lady (5)
Red Admiral (2)
Red-spotted Purple (1)
Little Wood Satyr (2)
Silver-spotted Skipper (2)
Dreamy Duskywing (23)
Juvenal’s Duskywing (3)
Wild Indigo Duskywing (1)
Hobomok Skipper (3)

Our next stop was Lilypons, where we found 15 species, including FOS tawny-edged skipper:

Cabbage White (9)
Orange Sulphur (7)
Red-banded Hairstreak (1)
Eastern Tailed Blue (1)
American Snout (1)
Pearl Crescent (6)
Question Mark (8)
Mourning Cloak (2)
Red Admiral (9)
Common Sootywing (1)
Least Skipper (4)
Peck’s Skipper (1)
Tawny-edged Skipper (1)
Sachem (4)
Zabulon Skipper (1)

Next, we drove into Montgomery County and traveled to Hoyles Mill Conservation Park near Boyds to see if any Giant Swallowtails were flying (there weren’t). En route, we saw two Cloudless Sulphurs, the first along Route 28 near its intersection with Greenfield Road in Frederick County, then a second along Barnesville Road just west of the town of Barnesville in Montgomery County. It was pretty quiet at Hoyles Mill, where we found 14 species. Giant swallowtail was *not* among the species seen; while they are being reported elsewhere in the region and as far north as VT, several recent field trips to this park (traditionally a stronghold for giants) turned up nothing.  Denise Gibbs speculates this might have to do with degradation of nectar sources in the meadow at the parking area, which is being converted to native species but with the concomitant loss of nectar-producing invasives.  Highlight was the number of Zabulon males holding territories on the sunny side of the trail.

Pipevine Swallowtail (1)
Zebra Swallowtail (3)
Eastern Tiger Swallowtail (2)
Cabbage White (4)
Red-banded Hairstreak (1)
Eastern Tailed Blue (2)
Summer Azure (1)
Question Mark (1)
American Lady (1)
Red Admiral (2)
Little Wood Satyr (3)
Juvenal’s Duskywing (1)
Least Skipper (3)
Zabulon Skipper (9)

This entry was posted in Events and Meetings, Field Trips/Annual Counts, general butterfly news, sightings, Washington Area Butterfly Club. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s